Condition category
Mental and Behavioural Disorders
Date applied
26/03/2015
Date assigned
27/03/2015
Last edited
10/07/2017
Prospective/Retrospective
Retrospectively registered
Overall trial status
Completed
Recruitment status
No longer recruiting

Plain English Summary

Background and study aims
During adolescence, young people experience significant change - physically, psychologically and socially. This time can be very challenging for young people and their parents. It is important that parents provide young people with emotional support, set reasonable boundaries, and act as role models. At the same time, though, they have to come to terms with their child’s increasing independence. Friends become more important than family, and taking risks is part and parcel of adolescence for most young people. Moderate amounts of conflict between parent and teen are normal, but high levels of family conflict are unhelpful. In families who experience intense levels of conflict, young people are more likely to have behavioural problems and problems at school, running away and poor mental health. Providing support to parents is recognised as a significant factor in improving children’s lives. A review concluded that group-based parenting programmes are effective in improving child conduct problems, parental mental health and parenting skills, but this focused on children aged between 3 to 23 years. We know very little about what works for parents whose children are older. This study was designed to assess the effectiveness of a parenting programme called Parenting UR Teens. The programme was developed by a voluntary agency that specialises in supporting parents (Parenting NI). It aims to help parents develop their parenting skills and knowledge; improve parent-teen relationships; improve parental mental health and family functioning, and reduce parental stress. Parenting UR Teen is a group-based programme, delivered over eight two-hour sessions and organised around the following themes: i) building firm foundations, ii) parenting styles, iii) teen development, iv) self-esteem, v) rules and consequences, vi) conflict, vii) problem solving and viii) pulling it all together. Sessions consist of presentations by programme facilitators, group discussions, role-plays, and problem solving and homework tasks.

Who can participate?
Parents of adolescents who were concerned about the challenge of parenting their teenager(s).

What does the study involve?
Over an 18-month period, Parenting NI advertise the programme in 13 places in Northern Ireland. For the duration of the study, parents who apply to attend the course are informed that agreeing to take part in a study is a condition of being offered a place on the programme. Parents who agree are randomly allocated to either start at the next available date (usually a couple of weeks), or to be placed on a waiting list for a programme in about 12 weeks’ time. Parents who take part in the study are asked to complete a number of questionnaires. Those allocated to the intervention group complete these at the beginning and end of the programme. Those allocated to the wait-list control group (who get the programme about 2-3 months later) also complete questionnaires. They do this before the start of the programme attended by the intervention parents and before and after they attend their own programme.

What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
Potential benefits include improved knowledge and skills in parenting adolescents as all participants eventually receive the intervention. No risks associated with taking part in this study have been identified.

Where is the study run from?
13 locations across Northern Ireland

When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for?
August 2010 to July 2012

Who is funding the study?
The study was funded by Parenting NI by means of a grant from Atlantic Philantropies

Who is the main contact?
Geraldine Macdonald
Geraldine.Macdonald@qub.ac.uk

Trial website

Contact information

Type

Public

Primary contact

Mrs Louise Dunlop

ORCID ID

Contact details

Head of Research Governance
Research and Enterprise Directorate
Room 01.095 Lanyon North
Queen's University Belfast
Belfast
BT7 1NN
United Kingdom
+44 (0)28 9097 2572
l.h.dunlop@qub.ac.uk

Type

Scientific

Additional contact

Dr Geraldine Macdonald

ORCID ID

Contact details

Queens University
Belfast
BT7 1NN
United Kingdom

Additional identifiers

EudraCT number

ClinicalTrials.gov number

Protocol/serial number

N/A

Study information

Scientific title

A randomised trial of the effectiveness of a parenting programme for parents of adolescents

Acronym

Parenting UR Teen

Study hypothesis

Compared with those on a waiting list, parents attending the Parenting Ur Teen Programme will improve their parenting knowledge and skills, have fewer conflicts with their teenager, and parents and adolescents will have more positive relationships.

Ethics approval

Research Ethics Committee of the School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, Queen's University, Belfast

Study design

Exploratory randomized controlled trial with waitlist control

Primary study design

Interventional

Secondary study design

Randomised controlled trial

Trial setting

Community

Trial type

Prevention

Patient information sheet

Not available in web format, please use the contact details to request a patient information sheet

Condition

Adolescent problem behaviour

Intervention

Over an 18-month period, Parenting NI advertised the programme in 13 places in Northern Ireland. For the duration of the study, parents who applied to attend the course were informed that agreeing to take part in a trial was a condition of being offered a place on the programme. Parents who agreed were randomised to start at the next available date (usually a couple of weeks), or be placed on a waiting list for a programme in approximately 12 weeks’ time.

Parents who took part in the study were asked to complete a number of questionnaires. Those randomised to the intervention group complete these at the beginning and end of the programme. Those randomised to the wait-list control group (who got the programme about 2-3 months later) also completed questionnaires. They did this before the start of the programme attended by the intervention parents and before and after they attended their own programme.

Intervention type

Behavioural

Phase

Drug names

Primary outcome measures

1. Parental wellbeing, measured by General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and the Stress Index for Parents of Adolescents (SIPA_
2. Parent-adolescent relationship, assessed by Parent Adolescent Relationships Questionnaire (PARQ)
3. Adolescent social functioning, assessed by parent report on the SIPA and the Child Disclosure Domain of the Stattin and Kerr Parental Monitoring scales

Primary outcomes for the experimental group were measured immediately pre and post intervention. Those in the wait-list control completed the measures at three points: before the intervention group commenced their programme, and 3 months later, immediately before and after receiving the intervention.

Secondary outcome measures

1. Parenting (monitoring, parental knowledge and parental control), assessed using the Stattin and Kerr Parental Monitoring scales
2. Family functioning (communication, problem-solving and maladaptive beliefs), assessed using the relevant subscales of the PARQ
3. Teen social functioning (i.e., moodiness and social isolation, risk of behaving in a delinquent manner, perseverance at school), assessed by parental report using the relevant domains of the Stress Index for Parents of Adolescents (SIPA)

Secondary outcomes for the experimental group were measured immediately pre and post intervention. Those in the wait-list control completed the measures at three points: before the intervention group commenced their programme, and 3 months later, immediately before and after receiving the intervention.

Overall trial start date

01/08/2010

Overall trial end date

31/07/2012

Reason abandoned

Eligibility

Participant inclusion criteria

1. Parents of adolescents who were concerned about the challenge of parenting their teenager(s)
2. Parents could either seek to attend the programme because of an existing difficulty or in anticipation of the need to develop their parenting skills to meet the challenge of parenting an adolescent
3. Parents who applied to attend courses run between January 2011 and April 2012 in 13 locations across Northern Ireland
4. For the duration of the study, participation in the study was also an eligibility criterion for participation in the parenting programme

Participant type

Other

Age group

Adult

Gender

Both

Target number of participants

120

Participant exclusion criteria

Parents were deemed ineligible to participate in the programme if they did not live with their adolescent child, or if they had severe mental health difficulties. In these circumstances, the programme organisers would offer alternative support (e.g., one-to-one sessions, a place on an alternative programme within the organisation).

Recruitment start date

02/12/2010

Recruitment end date

13/02/2012

Locations

Countries of recruitment

United Kingdom

Trial participating centre

Queen's University Belfast
Belfast
BT7 1NN
United Kingdom

Sponsor information

Organisation

Queens University, Belfast

Sponsor details

c/o Louise Dunlop
Head of Research Governance
Research and Enterprise Directorate
Room 01.096 Lanyon North
Belfast
BT7 1NN
United Kingdom
+44 (0)28 9097 2572
l.h.dunlop@qub.ac.uk

Sponsor type

University/education

Website

Funders

Funder type

Charity

Funder name

Atlantic Philanthropies

Alternative name(s)

Funding Body Type

private sector organisation

Funding Body Subtype

international

Location

United States of America

Results and Publications

Publication and dissemination plan

The trialists would like to publish a scientific account of the outcome of this study in a journal and papers relevant to policy makers and service providers - to be confirmed at a later date.

Intention to publish date

Participant level data

Available on request

Results - basic reporting

Publication summary

Publication citations

Additional files

Editorial Notes

10/07/2017: No publications found, verifying study status with principal investigator.