Condition category
Not Applicable
Date applied
16/02/2015
Date assigned
26/03/2015
Last edited
26/03/2015
Prospective/Retrospective
Retrospectively registered
Overall trial status
Completed
Recruitment status
No longer recruiting

Plain English Summary

Background and study aims
The workplace is an important potential setting for physical activity (PA) interventions (i.e. programmes). However, few workplace PA interventions take full advantage of work breaks and result in limited-to-modest success. Booster Breaks are organized work breaks that are designed to improve employees physical and psychological health, increase job satisfaction and improve work productivity. Booster Breaks have been developed to alleviate work-related stress and encourage more PA behavior in employees that may otherwise have sedentary jobs. Examples of Booster Breaks include short exercise or meditation sessions. The aim of this study is to test whether Booster Breaks increase PA among sedentary employees, compared with individualized PA work breaks and typical work breaks.

Who can participate?
Employees with sedentary office jobs from four workplaces in a large, urban southwestern U.S. city.

What does the study involve?
Participants are randomized into one of three groups. Those in group 1 are assigned to the Usual Break (control) group. Those in group 2 are assigned to the Computer Prompt (individualized PA work breaks) group. Those in group 3 are assigned to the Booster Break group. The Usual Break condition includes usual or typical work break practices and behaviors. The two interventions are developed to be consistent with the WHO Healthy Workplace Framework and Model. The individualized Computer Prompt condition is designed to interrupt prolonged sitting time by introducing 3-minute breaks, 5 times per day. The group-based Booster Break condition is a peer-led, once-a-day, 15-minute PA session that guides employees through a series of stretching, strengthening, and aerobic movements followed by a brief meditation. Based on a participation rate threshold of 70%, workplaces were classified either as consistent or inconsistent implementers of the intervention. A number of physiological and behavioral measures are assessed before the study starts and 6 months later.

What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
Not provided at time of registration

Where is the study run from?
Four different work places in a large, urban southwestern U.S. city

When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for?
January 2009 to January 2013

Who is funding the study?
National Institutes of Health (USA)

Who is the main contact?
Dr Wendell Taylor

Trial website

Contact information

Type

Scientific

Primary contact

Dr. Wendell Taylor

ORCID ID

Contact details

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
School of Public Health
CHPPR
7000 Fannin Street
Suite 2670
Houston
TX 77030
United States of America

Additional identifiers

EudraCT number

ClinicalTrials.gov number

Protocol/serial number

NIH (Grant No. R03 NR010291)

Study information

Scientific title

Impact of Booster Breaks on physical activity among sedentary employees: a cluster randomized controlled trial

Acronym

Study hypothesis

It was hypothesized that, compared with non-Booster Break participants, Booster Break participants will have significant improvements in:
1. Physiological measures (i.e., blood pressure, fasting lipids, triglycerides, and anthropometrics)
2. PA (increase) and sedentary behavior (decrease)
3. PA mediators
4. Employee and organizational psychosocial constructs

Ethics approval

This study was approved by the appropriate IRBs and the University Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects.

Study design

Randomized Controlled Trial

Primary study design

Interventional

Secondary study design

Randomised controlled trial

Trial setting

Community

Trial type

Prevention

Patient information sheet

Condition

Physical inactivity, sedentary behavior, obesity

Intervention

Participants were randomized to the Usual Break (control group), Computer Prompt, or Booster Break condition. The Usual Break condition included usual or typical work break practices and behaviors. The two interventions were developed to be consistent with the WHO Healthy Workplace Framework and Model. The individualized Computer Prompt condition was designed to interrupt prolonged sitting time by introducing 3-minute breaks, 5 times per day. The group-based Booster Break condition was a peer-led, once-a-day, 15-minute PA session that guides employees through a series of stretching, strengthening, and aerobic movements followed by a brief meditation.

Intervention type

Behavioural

Phase

Drug names

Primary outcome measures

1. Lipid profile
2. Blood pressure
3. Height
4. Weight.
5. International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ)
6. Pedometer readings

Measures were taken as baseline and immediately after the intervention (i.e after 6 months)

Secondary outcome measures

Physical activity mediators and employee and organizational psychosocial constructs: self-report assessments.

Measures were taken as baseline and immediately after the intervention (i.e after 6 months)

Overall trial start date

09/01/2009

Overall trial end date

09/01/2013

Reason abandoned

Eligibility

Participant inclusion criteria

1. Participants’ jobs required sitting for at least 5 hours per day
2. English proficiency
3. Full-time employment [35–40 hours/week]
4. Age >17 years
5. No physician-limited physical activity

Participant type

Healthy volunteer

Age group

Adult

Gender

Both

Target number of participants

3 clusters, 5 departments in each cluster, 5 to 15 individuals in each department

Participant exclusion criteria

1. Physician prohibited physical activity
2. Part-time employees

Recruitment start date

09/01/2009

Recruitment end date

09/01/2012

Locations

Countries of recruitment

United States of America

Trial participating centre

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston
School of Public Health CHPPR 7000 Fannin Street Suite 2670
Houston
TX 77030
United States of America

Sponsor information

Organisation

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Sponsor details

7000 Fannin Street
Suite 2670
Houston
TX 77030
United States of America

Sponsor type

University/education

Website

Funders

Funder type

Government

Funder name

National Institutes of Health

Alternative name(s)

NIH

Funding Body Type

government organisation

Funding Body Subtype

federal/national government

Location

United States of America

Results and Publications

Publication and dissemination plan

Intention to publish date

Participant level data

Not expected to be available

Results - basic reporting

Publication summary

Publication citations

  1. Taylor WC1, Shegog R, Chen V, Rempel DM, Baun MP, Bush CL, Green T, Hare-Everline N., The Booster Break program: description and feasibility test of a worksite physical activity daily practice., Work, 2010, 37, 4, 433-443, doi: doi: 10.3233/WOR-2010-1097.

  2. Taylor WC1, King KE, Shegog R, Paxton RJ, Evans-Hudnall GL, Rempel DM, Chen V, Yancey AK., Booster Breaks in the workplace: participants' perspectives on health-promoting work breaks, Health Educ Res, 2013, 414-425, doi: doi: 10.1093/her/cyt001.

Additional files

Editorial Notes