Condition category
Circulatory System
Date applied
26/07/2011
Date assigned
26/07/2011
Last edited
19/06/2015
Prospective/Retrospective
Retrospectively registered
Overall trial status
Completed
Recruitment status
No longer recruiting

Plain English Summary

Background and study aims
About 150,000 people in the UK have a stroke for the first time each year, with significant cost to health and social care. A third of them experience aphasia, a communication disorder which affects speaking, understanding, writing or reading. Aphasia is associated with longer stays in hospital and has severe consequences for all aspects of life. People with aphasia may not fully benefit from stroke rehabilitation for a number of reasons to do with their communication. They may struggle to understand questions or follow instructions, or be unable to express their needs, leading to great frustration. Information must be communicated in particular ways to be accessible to them, or they may need additional help to set goals. Staff do not necessarily have the skills to support people with aphasia in these ways. ‘Supported communication’ uses a set of techniques to make communication accessible for people with aphasia. A skilled communication partner uses low-tech resources such as pen/paper, pictures, symbols, calendars, or gestures to break down barriers and enable understanding and expression. Research with community volunteers and students has shown that there are beneficial effects for conversation and engagement. Supported communication could be used by any member of the stroke team to help patients with aphasia to engage more fully in rehabilitation. It has the potential to improve the quality of care, and address some of the key aims of stroke rehabilitation such as adapting to disability, and increasing quality of life and well-being. Previous studies have mostly focussed on its use outside the clinical context. This study aims to build on this evidence and see whether supported communication is a technique that can be learned by stroke unit staff, and used during everyday rehabilitation to enhance participation and improve outcomes for people with aphasia.

Who can participate?
Healthcare staff from two stroke units.

What does the study involve?
We recruited healthcare staff from two stroke units; staff at one unit were trained in supported communication, while the other unit received the usual training.

What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
The results of the study will be used to help design a more comprehensive study.

Where is the study run from?
University of East Anglia (UK).

When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for?
From June 2011 to September 2012.

Who is funding the study?
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (UK).

Who is the main contact?
Dr Simon Horton
s.horton@uea.ac.uk

Trial website

Contact information

Type

Scientific

Primary contact

Dr SImon Horton

ORCID ID

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2133-1410

Contact details

University of East Anglia
School of Allied Health Professions
The Queen's Building
Earlham Road
Norwich
NR4 7TJ
United Kingdom
-
s.horton@uea.ac.uk

Additional identifiers

EudraCT number

ClinicalTrials.gov number

Protocol/serial number

9370

Study information

Scientific title

Supported Communication to Improve Participation in Rehabilitation of people with moderate-severe aphasia after a first stroke: a pilot study (SCIP-R)

Acronym

SCIPR

Study hypothesis

About a third of people who have a stroke for the first time experience aphasia, a communication disorder affecting speaking, understanding, writing or reading. Aphasia is associated with longer stays in hospital and has severe consequences for all aspects of life. People with aphasia may not fully benefit from stroke rehabilitation for a number of reasons to do with their communication. They may be unable to understand questions, follow instructions, or express their needs. This may lead to misunderstanding and frustration. Information must be communicated in particular ways to be accessible to them, or they may need additional help to set goals. Staff are not necessarily trained in the skills to support people with aphasia in these ways.

'Supported communication' uses a set of techniques to make communication accessible for people with aphasia. A skilled communication partner uses low-tech resources such as pen/paper, pictures, symbols, calendars, or gestures to break down barriers and enable understanding and expression. Research with community volunteers and students has shown that there are beneficial effects for conversation and engagement.

Supported communication could be used by any member of the stroke team to help patients with aphasia to engage more fully in rehabilitation. It has the potential to improve the quality of care, and address some of the key aims of stroke rehabilitation such as adapting to disability, and increasing quality of life and wellbeing.

Previous studies have mostly focused on its use outside the clinical context. This study aims to build on this evidence and see whether supported communication is a technique that can be learned by stroke unit staff, and used during every day rehabilitation to enhance participation and improve outcomes for people with aphasia.

The results of the study will be used to strengthen the design of a more comprehensive trial.

Ethics approval

10/H0310/69

Study design

Non-randomised; Interventional; Design type: Process of Care

Primary study design

Interventional

Secondary study design

Non randomised study

Trial setting

GP practices

Trial type

Treatment

Patient information sheet

Condition

Topic: Stroke Research Network; Subtopic: Rehabilitation; Disease: Therapy type

Intervention

'Supported communication' uses a set of techniques to make communication accessible for people with aphasia. A skilled communication partner uses low tech resources such as pen/paper, pictures, symbols, calendars, or gestures to break down barriers and enable understanding and expression. Supported communication could be used by any member of the stroke team to help patients with aphasia to engage more fully in rehabilitation.; Study Entry : Registration only

Intervention type

Other

Phase

Phase II

Drug names

Primary outcome measures

Stroke and Aphasia Quality of Life Scale (SAQOL39g); Timepoint(s): Discharge from unit and 6 month follow-up

Secondary outcome measures

Not provided at time of registration

Overall trial start date

15/06/2011

Overall trial end date

30/09/2012

Reason abandoned

Eligibility

Participant inclusion criteria

1. Staff participants: nurses drawn from all day shifts (Bands 57)
2. Qualified therapy staff (Bands 57)
3. Therapy/healthcare assistants (Band 4)

Participant type

Health professional

Age group

Adult

Gender

Both

Target number of participants

Planned Sample Size: 100; UK Sample Size: 100

Participant exclusion criteria

Medical staff will be excluded: rotation of FY1 doctors makes it unlikely that they would be able to complete participation in the study

Recruitment start date

15/06/2011

Recruitment end date

30/09/2012

Locations

Countries of recruitment

United Kingdom

Trial participating centre

University of East Anglia
Norwich
NR4 7TJ
United Kingdom

Sponsor information

Organisation

NHS Norfolk (UK)

Sponsor details

Lakeside 400
Old Chapel Way
Broadland Business Park Thorpe St Andrew
Norwich
NR7 0WG
United Kingdom

Sponsor type

Hospital/treatment centre

Website

Funders

Funder type

Government

Funder name

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) (UK) - Research for Patient Benefit (RfPB) programme

Alternative name(s)

Funding Body Type

Funding Body Subtype

Location

Results and Publications

Publication and dissemination plan

Not provided at time of registration

Intention to publish date

Participant level data

Not provided at time of registration

Results - basic reporting

Publication summary

2015 results in: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02687038.2014.1000819

Publication citations

Additional files

Editorial Notes