Condition category
Signs and Symptoms
Date applied
02/02/2018
Date assigned
02/03/2018
Last edited
02/03/2018
Prospective/Retrospective
Retrospectively registered
Overall trial status
Ongoing
Recruitment status
Recruiting

Plain English Summary

Background and study aims
Up to half of all children with reading problems find it difficult to see text clearly; letters appear to blur, glare, go double or move around, and these problems can give them headaches. These visual symptoms probably result from reduced precision of timing visual events. There are good physiological reasons for supposing that viewing text through either simple blue or yellow coloured filters may improve the brain’s timing functions. We have found that we can predict which children are likely to benefit from blue or yellow or no filters. Using the appropriate filter for reading is often followed by rapid reading and spelling progress. However, there is no agreement about whether coloured filters can really help more than as a placebo. Clearly this question needs to be settled because if simple and cheap blue or yellow filters can really help reading difficulties, this low cost technique should be used wherever appropriate, in order to help a substantial proportion of the 10% of primary school children who have great difficulties learning to read. This study aims to assess the effects of blue and yellow coloured filters to see if it helps children with dyslexia learn to read.

Who can participate?
Children age 7 to 11 years with visual reading problems

What does the study involve?
Based on their visual symptoms, participants are allocated to a blue filter group or yellow filter group. Then, selected at random, the ‘blues’ are asked to wear either blue or placebo grey filters for 3 months, then all switch to blue. Likewise the ‘yellows’ are randomised to yellow or placebo grey, then all switch to yellow after 3 months. Participants use their filter when reading, and are followed up with reading history, psychometric (pen and paper tests) of their reading, spelling and general abilities together with the routine eye assessments at 3, 6 and 9 months.

What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
The participants may benefit from improved reading from the appropriate colour filter more than by the placebo grey filter. None of the colours are likely to harm the children in any way.

Where is the study run from?
Dyslexia Research Trust Clinic (UK)

When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for?
September 2014 to August 2019

Who is funding the study?
Dyslexia Research Trust (UK)

Who is the main contact?
Prof John Stein (Public)
John.stein@dpag.ox.ac.uk

Trial website

Contact information

Type

Public

Primary contact

Prof John Stein

ORCID ID

http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5843-8986

Contact details

DPAG
Sherrington Building
Parks Road
Oxford
OX1 3PT
United Kingdom
+44(0) 1865 272552
john.stein@dpag.ox.ac.uk

Additional identifiers

EudraCT number

ClinicalTrials.gov number

Protocol/serial number

CUREC - YB2015, Date and Version No: 06.08.15 version 1:2

Study information

Scientific title

The Effect of Yellow and Blue lenses on Reading and Spelling Skills

Acronym

Study hypothesis

Children with visual reading problems will be helped to learn to read by viewing text through blue or yellow filters.

Ethics approval

Oxford University Medical Sciences Div. Research Ethics Board, 01/09/2014, ref: MSD-IDREC-C -2014-024

Study design

Randomised controlled trial

Primary study design

Interventional

Secondary study design

Randomised controlled trial

Trial setting

Schools

Trial type

Treatment

Patient information sheet

Not available in web format yet, please use the contact details below to request a patient information sheet

Condition

Children's visual reading problems (dyslexia)

Intervention

Based on their visual symptoms, participants are allocated to a blue filter group or yellow filter group. Then, selected at random, the ‘blues’ are asked to wear either blue or placebo grey filters for 3 months , then all switch to blue. Likewise the ‘yellows’ are randomised to yellow or placebo grey, then all switch to yellow after 3 months.
Participants use their filter when reading, and are followed up with psychometric and visual assessments at 3, 6 and 9 months.

Intervention type

Device

Phase

Drug names

Primary outcome measures

Single word reading progress is measured using BAS reading and spelling at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months
Visual reading symptoms are measured using visual symptoms questionnaire at baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months

Secondary outcome measures

Optometric status is measured using standard optometric tests at baseline, 3 months, 6 months and 9 months

Overall trial start date

01/09/2014

Overall trial end date

31/08/2019

Reason abandoned

Eligibility

Participant inclusion criteria

1. Children with visual reading problems
2. Age 7-11
3. Male and female

Participant type

Patient

Age group

Child

Gender

Both

Target number of participants

200

Participant exclusion criteria

1. English not first language
2. Any medical or neurological diagnosis

Recruitment start date

01/09/2016

Recruitment end date

31/03/2019

Locations

Countries of recruitment

United Kingdom

Trial participating centre

Dyslexia Research Trust Clinic
179a Oxford Road
Reading
RG1 7UZ
United Kingdom

Sponsor information

Organisation

Dyslexia Research Trust

Sponsor details

Magdalen College
Oxford
OX1 4AU
United Kingdom
+44(0) 1865 276000
john.stein@dpag.ox.ac.uk

Sponsor type

Charity

Website

www.dyslexic.org.uk

Funders

Funder type

Charity

Funder name

Dyslexia Research Trust

Alternative name(s)

Funding Body Type

Funding Body Subtype

Location

Results and Publications

Publication and dissemination plan

Dyslexia Research Trust newsletter www.dyslexic.org.uk
Planned publication in educational and medical peer reviewed journals.

IPD sharing statement:
The datasets generated during and/or analysed during the current study are/will be available upon request from Prof J Stein, Sherrington Building, Parks Road, OX1 3PT.

Study protocol and additonal documentation also available from Prof J Stein.

Intention to publish date

01/01/2020

Participant level data

Available on request

Results - basic reporting

Publication summary

Publication citations

Additional files

Editorial Notes