Condition category
Nutritional, Metabolic, Endocrine
Date applied
21/07/2015
Date assigned
30/07/2015
Last edited
05/08/2015
Prospective/Retrospective
Retrospectively registered
Overall trial status
Completed
Recruitment status
No longer recruiting

Plain English Summary

Background and study aims
Dietary improvements may help reduce the prevalence of obesity and certain chronic diseases. Improvements in cooking skills could lead to dietary improvements. Evidence suggests there has been a reduction in cooking skills in the UK population over the past 20 years. The past decade has witnessed an increase in interventions to increase cooking skills aimed at addressing this skills gap. However, a link has yet to be demonstrated between cooking skills and diet. This research has three aims: to analyse existing data to explore associations between cooking skills and diet in the UK population; to conduct analysis of an existing cooking skills intervention; and to conduct a pilot study of a cooking skills intervention. The aim of this study is to find out whether cooking skills interventions are likely to be effective and whether robust evaluation of cooking skills interventions is both practical and feasible.

Who can participate?
Adults aged 18 or over with poor cooking skills.

What does the study involve?
Participants will be randomly allocated to one of two groups. The intervention group will attend an adult cooking skills course comprising eight 60-90 minute weekly sessions at community venues (The Jamie Oliver Ministry of Food (JOMoF) adult cooking skills course).The control group will be offered the cooking skills course after the end of the study.

What are the possible benefits and risks of participating?
The potential benefits of the intervention are that individuals gain confidence and skills in cooking from raw ingredients; and that this, in turn, leads them to eat a healthier diet. Others in a household may also benefit from healthier food preparation, or transfer of skills. There are no major risks to participating. However, working in a kitchen, even supervised, may result in occasional accidental injuries, which can include cuts from kitchen knives, scalding or burns from cooking equipment or hot foods, and inflammation resulting from contact with certain foods (e.g. chillies) if hands are not thoroughly washed before contact with, for example, eyes. These events are very rare and mitigated by appropriate training and safety protocols within the trial.

Where is the study run from?
Institute of Health & Society, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University (UK).

When is the study starting and how long is it expected to run for?
From April 2013 to July 2015.

Who is funding the study?
Policy Research Programme, Department of Health (UK).

Who is the main contact?
Prof Martin White
martin.white@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk

Trial website

Contact information

Type

Scientific

Primary contact

Prof Martin White

ORCID ID

http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1861-6757

Contact details

Centre for Diet & Activity Research (CEDAR)
MRC Epidemiology Unit
School of Clinical Medicine
University of Cambridge
Cambridge
CB2 0QQ
United Kingdom
+44 (0)12237 69159
martin.white@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk

Additional identifiers

EudraCT number

ClinicalTrials.gov number

Protocol/serial number

RES/0150/7794

Study information

Scientific title

Research to support the evaluation and implementation of adult cooking skills interventions in the UK: pilot randomized controlled trial with process and economic evaluation components

Acronym

Study hypothesis

This pilot randomized controlled trial aimed to establish the feasibility of conducting a definitive randomized controlled trial of an adult cooking skills intervention.

Ethics approval

Newcastle University Research Ethics Committee, 22/08/2013, ref: 00659/2013

Study design

Single-centre multi-site community-based pilot randomized controlled trial with process and economic evaluations

Primary study design

Interventional

Secondary study design

Randomised controlled trial

Trial setting

Community

Trial type

Prevention

Patient information sheet

Not available in web format, please use the contact details below to request a patient information sheet

Condition

Prevention of chronic non-communicable diseases associated with unhealthy diet

Intervention

1. Intervention arm - an adult cooking skills course delivered to groups of 6-10 participants, comprising eight 60-90 minute weekly sessions at community venues (The Jamie Oliver Ministry of Food (JOMoF) adult cooking skills course).
2. Control arm - no intervention during the 12-week follow-up period. Control arm participants were offered the cooking skills course after final data collection.

Intervention type

Behavioural

Phase

Drug names

Primary outcome measures

As this was a pilot randomized controlled trial, there was no primary outcome. However, a number of measures were collected to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and trial procedures. These data were specified by our research questions as follows:

1. What is the theoretical basis, in terms of behaviour change, of the JOMoF cooking skills intervention?
2. What is the fidelity of the JOMoF cooking skills intervention?
3. Are there temporal or locational variations in intervention fidelity?
4. What are the baseline self-reported cooking skills and socio-demographic characteristics of participants of a cooking skills intervention?
5. How do the baseline self-reported cooking skills and socio-demographic characteristics of wait-list recruits compare to community recruits?
6. Do the socio-demographic characteristics of wait-list recruits align with those identified as most in need of cooking skills interventions from research questions 1-4?
7. What are the consequences, both expected and unexpected, of cooking skills interventions for UK adults, as identified by cooking skills intervention participants and providers?
8. How practical and acceptable are cooking skills interventions for UK adult participants as well as those involved in commissioning and delivery?
9. How practical and acceptable are the research methods proposed for a definitive RCT of a multi-site cooking skills intervention, for both UK adult participants as well as those involved in commissioning and delivery?
10. What factors affect non-recruitment, attrition, attendance and compliance with data collection methods?
11. Is economic evaluation of a cooking skills intervention feasible?

Secondary outcome measures

See above under primary outcomes. As this was a pilot randomized controlled trial there were no primary or secondary outcomes.

Overall trial start date

29/04/2013

Overall trial end date

24/07/2015

Reason abandoned

Eligibility

Participant inclusion criteria

1. Adults aged 18 years or over
2. Living in the community
3. Self-perceived poor cooking skills
4. Able to speak fluent English

Participant type

Healthy volunteer

Age group

Adult

Gender

Both

Target number of participants

96

Participant exclusion criteria

1. Aged under 18 years
2. Unable to speak English fluently

Recruitment start date

13/10/2013

Recruitment end date

07/07/2014

Locations

Countries of recruitment

United Kingdom

Trial participating centre

Institute of Health & Society, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University
Baddiley-Clark Building, Richardson Road
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4AX
United Kingdom

Sponsor information

Organisation

Newcastle University (UK)

Sponsor details

Faculty of Medical Sciences
Framlington Place
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE2 4HH
United Kingdom

Sponsor type

University/education

Website

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/res/about/office/research/joint.htm

Funders

Funder type

Government

Funder name

Policy Research Programme, Department of Health (UK)

Alternative name(s)

Funding Body Type

Funding Body Subtype

Location

Results and Publications

Publication and dissemination plan

The results will be published in a full report to the funder (UK Department of Health, Policy Research Programme) and in peer-reviewed journal publications. a lay summary of the findings will be made available to stakeholders.

Intention to publish date

31/01/2016

Participant level data

Available on request

Results - basic reporting

Publication summary

Publication citations

Additional files

Editorial Notes